Clinical criteria for determining treatment.

Due to known levels of resistance to currently available pediculicides, guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the latest evidence-based clinical data provide the criteria for determining safe and effective treatment options.1,2

Warning Lice Sign
Dr. Christopher Belcher:

Dr. Christopher Belcher:

“If we don’t have a good understanding of the clinical data regarding head lice products, such as known resistance, absorption, toxicities, AEs, effectiveness and environmental impact—knowing that many of these agents are often used to eradicate other insects—we place the entire family’s well-being at stake.”

References:

  1. Johannes C van der Wouden, Tim Klootwijk , Laurence Le Cleach , Giao Do , Robert Vander Stichele , Arie Knuistingh Neven , Just AH Eekhof: The Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group; Interventions for treating head lice. The Cochrane Library 2011
  2. Devore CD, Schutze GE. And the Council on School Health and Committee on Infectious Diseases. Head Lice (Clinical Report). Pediatrics. 2015; 135(5):e1355- e1365.

NAT-RRW5-000

Indication
Natroba™ Topical Suspension is a pediculicide indicated for the topical treatment of head lice infestations in patients six (6) months of age and older.

Adjunctive Measures
Natroba™ Topical Suspension should be used in the context of an overall lice management program:

Important Safety Information

Indication
Natroba™ Topical Suspension is a pediculicide indicated for the topical treatment of head lice infestations in patients six (6) months of age and older.

Adjunctive Measures
Natroba™ Topical Suspension should be used in the context of an overall lice management program:
• Wash (in hot water) or dry clean all recently worn clothing, hats, used bedding and towels
• Wash personal care items such as combs, brushes, and hair clips in hot water
• A fine-toothed comb or special nit comb may be used to remove dead lice and nits.

Important Safety Information
Natroba™ Topical Suspension contains benzyl alcohol and is not recommended for use in neonates and infants below the age of 6 months. Systemic exposure to benzyl alcohol has been associated with serious adverse reactions and death in neonates and low birth-weight infants when administered intravenously. Most common adverse events were: application site redness (3%), eye redness (2%) and application site irritation (1%).

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.